Summer School «European and Comparative Law» (6ª edición)

La Summer School “European and Comparative Law” es una escuela con contenidos introductorios relacionados con la realidad jurídica y política europea, con énfasis en temas de actualidad.

Programa

El curso está estructurado en ocho módulos. Cada módulo está a cargo de uno o dos profesores/as de la Facultad de Derecho de la UAM y consta de ocho horas de clase presencial (virtual). Durante las sesiones, se realizará una introducción a un tema general y se expondrá un tema de actualidad nacional o internacional vinculado al mismo, realizándose, asimismo, ejercicios sobre ellos. En algunos casos, se realizarán durante las sesiones actividades vinculadas a las materias, como simulaciones, debates o la proyección de algunos materiales audiovisuales que se trabajarán durante la clase.

  • MODULE 1: Intellectual Property Rights: a European overview (Professors Gemma María Minero Alejandre and Sebastián López Maza).
    In this module we will study European Directives on copyright and related rights and the most recent European case-law interpreting autonomous concepts of IP Law, such as the originality, the exhaustion rule, the private copying exception and the internet providers’ liability.
  • MODULE 2: International Human Rights Courts and Democratic Governance (Professor Mariano Melero de la Torre)
    The aim of this module is to analyze and discuss the legal and philosophical questions raised by what is called the “international human rights judiciary”. With a particular attention to the European Court of Human Rights, we will consider the extent to which the principle of subsidiarity and the margin of appreciation doctrine can minimize the persistent tension between rights-based judicial review and majority rule.
    At the same time, the course will attempt to show to what extent international courts can endanger the basic rule of law standards of predictability and protection against arbitrariness. By the end of the course, students will have gained an insight into the work of international human rights courts and how these courts can contribute to strengthening democracy and the rule of law. The module breaks down into four sessions: (1) International human rights courts and domestic democratic processes; (2) The principle of subsidiarity in international law; (3) The European Court of Human Rights I: The living instrument doctrine; and (4) The European Court of Human Rights II: The margin of appreciation doctrine.
  • MODULE 3: The International Protection of Cultural Heritage (Professor Vanesa Menéndez Montero)
    IThis course aims to develop the student’s awareness about the protection of cultural heritage law both in wartime and peacetime. The lectures will provide students with a general understanding of the main UNESCO Conventions and international humanitarian law instruments concerning a variety of topics such as illicit trafficking of cultural property and the protection of tangible and intangible cultural manifestations. To complete the overall picture, it will also mention those areas of international law closely connected to the international protection of cultural heritage: environmental law, human rights law, international criminal law, and investment law.
  • MODULE 4: The right to education in liberal democracies (Professor Fernando de los Santos Menéndez)
    The course shall offer students conceptual and legal tools to assess educational laws and policies as a matter of justice. Two kinds of problems will be addressed. One kind revolves around the content of education. The other kind concerns the distribution of educational goods. The course is divided into eight sessions. The first one will be an introduction, and the last one a recapitulation. The other six will tackle current debates about issues of rights and justice in education. Session 2 will evaluate the permissibility of mandatory sex education in schools. Students will identify the reasons for the state to enforce such a content in the public curriculum, and for parents to resist such an enforcement. Also, students will learn to apply the proportionality test employed by the European Court of Human Rights in deciding cases of this kind. Section 3 will assess the place of religion in public education. We will discuss the principle of state’s neutrality. In addition, students will learn about the margin of appreciation that the European Court of Human Rights confers to states. In Session 4, we will explore the issue of homeschooling. Clips from the movie “Captain Fantastic” will feed the discussion. Also, we will discuss a landmark US Supreme Court case of Amish parents who wanted to homeschool their children. IWe will distinguish between (unjustified) internal restrictions and (justified) external protections of cultural and religious minority groups. Session 5 will shift the focus of the course to the distribution of educational goods. The ideal of equality of opportunity will be analyzed, and we will question meritocratic discourses in education. Students will learn the distinction between merit, desert, and entitlement. In session 6, we will discuss policies of affirmative action in the access to higher education. Affirmative action, also known as “positive discrimination”, will be distinguished from both direct and indirect discrimination. Students will debate about reasons for and against affirmative action policies. Session 7 will address the conflict between parental school choice and educational equality. Students will discuss the scope of legitimate parental partiality, despite its inegalitarian effects. They will also learn political strategies to level up the capacity and resources of parents to educate their children.Teaching materials will combine courts’ rulings, empirical studies, and academic papers. Participacion will be encourage by opening current political and legal debates in the domain of education. Each debate will be followed by a class vote. PowerPoint presentations will complement the explanations.
  • MODULE 5: The Influence of the ECtHR Case Law on the Principles of Criminal Law (Professor Marina Mínguez Rosique)
    This course aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the case law of the ECtHR on some of the most important limiting principles of criminal law. In states that have adopted a social and democratic system based on the rule of law, lawmakers are not totally free in their task of defining the content and duration of criminal sentences, but rather must confine themselves to a space limited by several constitutional principles. These principles not only guide criminal policy, but also constitute actual constitutional mandates for Criminal Law lawmakers. The existence of such mandates, whether express or implied, necessarily compel lawmakers to comply with obligations and prohibitions derived from those principles. Nevertheless, despite being principles that are widely acknowledged as such among Criminal Law scholars and are known to the public at large, the standard of protection for these principles (that is, their scope and content) is not clearly defined, thus making it difficult to determine the limits by which lawmakers are bound. At the European level, the case law of the European Court of Human Rights is an essential instrument for interpreting the principles that limit Criminal Law, since the Court’s interpretation of these principles is configured as a minimum standard that must be complied with by the States.
  • MODULE 6: European Consumer Law (Professor Alicia Agüero Ortiz)
    In this module we will study the most relevant aspects of European consumer law, such as the concept of consumer and the vulnerable consumer; the abusive clauses regime; consumer protection in distance contracting; the new guarantees regime of goods; the regulation of contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services; the consumer protection in financial markets; as well as the new regulation on intermediary platforms.
  • MODULE 7: New Trends on International and European Taxation for Multinational Enterprises (Professors Domingo Jesús Jiménez-Valladolid de L’Hotellerie-Fallois and Félix Daniel Martínez Laguna)
    This is an introductory course to International and European Taxation as well as to the most recent initiatives and proposals on the taxation of multinational enterprises. The course is divided in four main parts (2h each) dealing with (i) fundamentals of international taxation (e.g. sovereignty, international conventions, tax treaties); (ii) fundamentals of European taxation (e.g. TFEU, tax directives, CJEU’s rulings on tax matters); (iii) the global minimum tax proposal for multinational enterprises (GloBE); (iv) taxation of multinational enterprises within the digital economy. In short, this course will allow the students to have an overview of the basics of international and European taxation and to understand the efforts of international organizations (e.g. OECD) and the European Union to tackle strategies of multinational enterprises for not paying taxes or doing it at a very low rate within and without the digital economy.
  • MODULE 8: European Criminal Law (Professors Rut Lopera Viñé and Ana Belén Valverde Cano)
    The aim of this module is to offer an introduction to the harmonisation of criminal law within EU Member States. With this in mind, theoretical explanations of the following topics will be provided: 1. Introduction to key aspects of Criminal Law in EU countries: Germanic and Common-Law perspectives on wrongfulness, culpability, and defence; 2. References to normative aspects of Criminal Law in Europe; 3. EU Law (sources of primary and secondary law) and normative instruments with criminal law relevance: EU Framework Decisions and Directives; 4. The enforcement of other normative instruments: The European Arrest Warrant.
Días, horario y lugar de celebración
  • Días: Del 26 de junio al 21 de julio de 2023
  • Horario: De lunes a jueves de 09:00 a 11:00 y de 11:30 a 13:30
  • Lugar: Microsoft Teams
Equipo docente
  • Gemma María Minero Alejandre (Derecho UAM)
  • Sebastián López Maza (Derecho UAM)
  • Mariano Melero de la Torre (Derecho UAM)
  • Vanesa Menéndez Montero (Derecho UAM)
  • Fernando de los Santos Menéndez (Derecho UAM)
  • Marina Mínguez Rosique (Derecho UAM)
  • Alicia Agüero Ortiz (Derecho UAM)
  • Domingo Jesús Jiménez-Valladolid de L´Hotellerie-Fallois (Derecho UAM)
  • Félix Daniel Martínez Laguna (Derecho UAM)
  • Rut Lopera Viñé (Derecho UAM)
  • Ana Belén Valverde Cano (Derecho UAM)

 

Requisitos previos de acceso

La escuela está dirigida a estudiantes del Grado en Derecho (o dobles Grados en los que uno sea Derecho) que posean un conocimiento de inglés suficiente para seguir y participar en los cursos. Se recomienda un nivel B2.

Criterios de evaluación

Por cada módulo los estudiantes realizarán en clase una prueba de evaluación sobre los temas vistos y ampliados en los materiales que los profesores pongan a su disposición. El tiempo total previsto para preparar y realizar dichas pruebas está estimado en 3 horas para todos los módulos que componen el curso. Los profesores de cada módulo definirán al principio de cada módulo los temas posibles sobre los que versará el examen.
Para la obtención de los créditos, es imprescindible la asistencia a 80% de las sesiones. La calificación será numérica.

PONDERACIÓN DE LA NOTA FINAL:

  • Asistencia a clase: 10%
  • Evaluación continua (participación activa en clase y preparación y presentación de respuestas a casos prácticos en grupo): 20%
  • Examen final de cada módulo: 70%
Matriculación y reconocimiento de ECTs

MATRICULACIÓN:

Summer School «European and Comparative Law» (6ª edición)

  • Matrícula Ordinaria –> 650€
  • Matrícula Alumni UAM+, Alumni UAM+Plus, Alumnos UAM, Amigos de la UAM –> 585€

 

*Para beneficiarse de la matrícula reducida, los estudiantes  deben inscribirse con su correo institucional  @estudiante.uam.es*

PLAZAS OFERTADAS

Máximo 40 plazas

**El curso se impartirá si alcanza el mínimo de 20 estudiantes**

RECONOCIMIENTO DE ECTS:

Accede aquí para consultar los cursos con reconocimiento de créditos

Becas y criterios de concesión

Cantidad: 4 becas

Criterios:

  • Estar desempleado: 40%
  • Situación socio-económica: 30%
  • Expediente académico: 30%

**Para solicitar una beca debe ponerse en contacto con la dirección del curso: marina.minguez@uam.es

Departamento
Derecho Privado, Social y Económico
Centro
Facultad de Derecho
Categoría
DER Derecho
IP/Director
Sebastian Lopez Maza
Marina Minguez Rosique
Modalidad
Presencial
Fecha inicio
26/06/2023
Fecha fin
21/07/2023
Precio
Matrícula ordinaria: 650€; Matrícula Alumni UAM+, Alumni UAM+Plus, Alumnos UAM, Amigos de la UAM: 585€
aaa1687823999
* Las inscripciones finalizan el 19/06/2023
Programa
Días, horario y lugar de celebración
Equipo docente
Requisitos previos de acceso
Criterios de evaluación
Matriculación y reconocimiento de ECTs
Becas y criterios de concesión
Programa

El curso está estructurado en ocho módulos. Cada módulo está a cargo de uno o dos profesores/as de la Facultad de Derecho de la UAM y consta de ocho horas de clase presencial (virtual). Durante las sesiones, se realizará una introducción a un tema general y se expondrá un tema de actualidad nacional o internacional vinculado al mismo, realizándose, asimismo, ejercicios sobre ellos. En algunos casos, se realizarán durante las sesiones actividades vinculadas a las materias, como simulaciones, debates o la proyección de algunos materiales audiovisuales que se trabajarán durante la clase.

  • MODULE 1: Intellectual Property Rights: a European overview (Professors Gemma María Minero Alejandre and Sebastián López Maza).
    In this module we will study European Directives on copyright and related rights and the most recent European case-law interpreting autonomous concepts of IP Law, such as the originality, the exhaustion rule, the private copying exception and the internet providers’ liability.
  • MODULE 2: International Human Rights Courts and Democratic Governance (Professor Mariano Melero de la Torre)
    The aim of this module is to analyze and discuss the legal and philosophical questions raised by what is called the “international human rights judiciary”. With a particular attention to the European Court of Human Rights, we will consider the extent to which the principle of subsidiarity and the margin of appreciation doctrine can minimize the persistent tension between rights-based judicial review and majority rule.
    At the same time, the course will attempt to show to what extent international courts can endanger the basic rule of law standards of predictability and protection against arbitrariness. By the end of the course, students will have gained an insight into the work of international human rights courts and how these courts can contribute to strengthening democracy and the rule of law. The module breaks down into four sessions: (1) International human rights courts and domestic democratic processes; (2) The principle of subsidiarity in international law; (3) The European Court of Human Rights I: The living instrument doctrine; and (4) The European Court of Human Rights II: The margin of appreciation doctrine.
  • MODULE 3: The International Protection of Cultural Heritage (Professor Vanesa Menéndez Montero)
    IThis course aims to develop the student’s awareness about the protection of cultural heritage law both in wartime and peacetime. The lectures will provide students with a general understanding of the main UNESCO Conventions and international humanitarian law instruments concerning a variety of topics such as illicit trafficking of cultural property and the protection of tangible and intangible cultural manifestations. To complete the overall picture, it will also mention those areas of international law closely connected to the international protection of cultural heritage: environmental law, human rights law, international criminal law, and investment law.
  • MODULE 4: The right to education in liberal democracies (Professor Fernando de los Santos Menéndez)
    The course shall offer students conceptual and legal tools to assess educational laws and policies as a matter of justice. Two kinds of problems will be addressed. One kind revolves around the content of education. The other kind concerns the distribution of educational goods. The course is divided into eight sessions. The first one will be an introduction, and the last one a recapitulation. The other six will tackle current debates about issues of rights and justice in education. Session 2 will evaluate the permissibility of mandatory sex education in schools. Students will identify the reasons for the state to enforce such a content in the public curriculum, and for parents to resist such an enforcement. Also, students will learn to apply the proportionality test employed by the European Court of Human Rights in deciding cases of this kind. Section 3 will assess the place of religion in public education. We will discuss the principle of state’s neutrality. In addition, students will learn about the margin of appreciation that the European Court of Human Rights confers to states. In Session 4, we will explore the issue of homeschooling. Clips from the movie “Captain Fantastic” will feed the discussion. Also, we will discuss a landmark US Supreme Court case of Amish parents who wanted to homeschool their children. IWe will distinguish between (unjustified) internal restrictions and (justified) external protections of cultural and religious minority groups. Session 5 will shift the focus of the course to the distribution of educational goods. The ideal of equality of opportunity will be analyzed, and we will question meritocratic discourses in education. Students will learn the distinction between merit, desert, and entitlement. In session 6, we will discuss policies of affirmative action in the access to higher education. Affirmative action, also known as “positive discrimination”, will be distinguished from both direct and indirect discrimination. Students will debate about reasons for and against affirmative action policies. Session 7 will address the conflict between parental school choice and educational equality. Students will discuss the scope of legitimate parental partiality, despite its inegalitarian effects. They will also learn political strategies to level up the capacity and resources of parents to educate their children.Teaching materials will combine courts’ rulings, empirical studies, and academic papers. Participacion will be encourage by opening current political and legal debates in the domain of education. Each debate will be followed by a class vote. PowerPoint presentations will complement the explanations.
  • MODULE 5: The Influence of the ECtHR Case Law on the Principles of Criminal Law (Professor Marina Mínguez Rosique)
    This course aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the case law of the ECtHR on some of the most important limiting principles of criminal law. In states that have adopted a social and democratic system based on the rule of law, lawmakers are not totally free in their task of defining the content and duration of criminal sentences, but rather must confine themselves to a space limited by several constitutional principles. These principles not only guide criminal policy, but also constitute actual constitutional mandates for Criminal Law lawmakers. The existence of such mandates, whether express or implied, necessarily compel lawmakers to comply with obligations and prohibitions derived from those principles. Nevertheless, despite being principles that are widely acknowledged as such among Criminal Law scholars and are known to the public at large, the standard of protection for these principles (that is, their scope and content) is not clearly defined, thus making it difficult to determine the limits by which lawmakers are bound. At the European level, the case law of the European Court of Human Rights is an essential instrument for interpreting the principles that limit Criminal Law, since the Court’s interpretation of these principles is configured as a minimum standard that must be complied with by the States.
  • MODULE 6: European Consumer Law (Professor Alicia Agüero Ortiz)
    In this module we will study the most relevant aspects of European consumer law, such as the concept of consumer and the vulnerable consumer; the abusive clauses regime; consumer protection in distance contracting; the new guarantees regime of goods; the regulation of contracts for the supply of digital content and digital services; the consumer protection in financial markets; as well as the new regulation on intermediary platforms.
  • MODULE 7: New Trends on International and European Taxation for Multinational Enterprises (Professors Domingo Jesús Jiménez-Valladolid de L’Hotellerie-Fallois and Félix Daniel Martínez Laguna)
    This is an introductory course to International and European Taxation as well as to the most recent initiatives and proposals on the taxation of multinational enterprises. The course is divided in four main parts (2h each) dealing with (i) fundamentals of international taxation (e.g. sovereignty, international conventions, tax treaties); (ii) fundamentals of European taxation (e.g. TFEU, tax directives, CJEU’s rulings on tax matters); (iii) the global minimum tax proposal for multinational enterprises (GloBE); (iv) taxation of multinational enterprises within the digital economy. In short, this course will allow the students to have an overview of the basics of international and European taxation and to understand the efforts of international organizations (e.g. OECD) and the European Union to tackle strategies of multinational enterprises for not paying taxes or doing it at a very low rate within and without the digital economy.
  • MODULE 8: European Criminal Law (Professors Rut Lopera Viñé and Ana Belén Valverde Cano)
    The aim of this module is to offer an introduction to the harmonisation of criminal law within EU Member States. With this in mind, theoretical explanations of the following topics will be provided: 1. Introduction to key aspects of Criminal Law in EU countries: Germanic and Common-Law perspectives on wrongfulness, culpability, and defence; 2. References to normative aspects of Criminal Law in Europe; 3. EU Law (sources of primary and secondary law) and normative instruments with criminal law relevance: EU Framework Decisions and Directives; 4. The enforcement of other normative instruments: The European Arrest Warrant.

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